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Undead Music Festival 2012

Tonic Reunion, MMW marathon highlight third annual alt-jazz bash in NYC

Jamie Saft performs at Le Poisson Rouge, NYC, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Vernon Reid (left) and Melvin Gibbs perform at Le Poisson Rouge, NYC, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Steven Bernstein performs at Le Poisson Rouge, NYC, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Marcus Rojas performs at Le Poisson Rouge, NYC, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Medeski Martin & Wood perform at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Marcus Rojas (left) and G. Calvin Weston perform at Le Poisson Rouge, NYC, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
John Medeski performs at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival
Marco Benevento guests with MMW at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple, as part of the 2012 Undead Music Festival

Decades ago it was George Wein, a man on a mission to spread the joy he felt from the music that touched his soul. Today two enthusiastic young curators are following in Wein’s footsteps. They’re shaking up the scene by presenting new music that thrills them, and defining a new audience in the process.

Jointly curated by Brice Rosenbloom of Boom Collective and Adam Schatz of Search & Restore, the Undead Music Festival has appealed to those whose eclectic tastes tend toward the fringes of creative improvised music. In its third year, the renegade festival (a kind of springtime counterpart to the equally adventurous Winter Jazz Fest) expanded its borders beyond New York for the first time, by organizing a “Night of the Living DIY” in homes, warehouses, artspaces and clubs in Chicago, Milwaukee, Austin, Houston, Seattle, Portland, Richmond, Oslo, Copenhagen and other host cities on May 11. The Festival’s final night, May 12, featured a series of improvised round-robin duets at New York City’s 92YTribeca.

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