Become a member and get exclusive access to articles, live sessions and more!
Start Your Free Trial

Concert Review: Wayne Shorter Quartet at Symphony Hall, Boston

Still adventurous, if not always transcendent

Wayne Shorter Quartet, Symphony Hall, Boston, Nov. 2013
Wayne Shorter Quartet, Symphony Hall, Boston, Nov. 2013
Wayne Shorter Quartet, Symphony Hall, Boston, Nov. 2013
Wayne Shorter Quartet, Symphony Hall, Boston, Nov. 2013
Wayne Shorter, International Jazz Day, UN, NYC, 4-12

The Celebrity Series of Boston brings some of the best concert-hall jazz to the city each year, and this past weekend, as part of its own 75th anniversary year, it outdid itself by booking what must surely have been the last of this year’s several celebrations of Wayne Shorter’s 80th birthday (whose actual date was August 25): a triple header at Symphony Hall of the trio billing itself ACS (for Geri Allen, Terri Lyne Carrington and Esperanza Spalding), the Dave Douglas and Joe Lovano co-led quintet Sound Prints, and Shorter’s own magnificent and longstanding acoustic quartet. For all that instrumental firepower, however, the evening was most memorable for reinforcing Shorter’s status as one of jazz’s greatest composers.

The hall was full of musicians (Miguel Zenón, Bill Pierce, Aristides Rivas and Tupac Mantilla of the Julian Lage Group, and the husband-wife duo Mili Bermejo and Dan Greenspan were among those in the audience) when ACS took the stage shortly after 5 p.m. for a set of their arrangements of a half-dozen Shorter classics. They led off with pieces associated with two previous great bands Shorter had been in: “Masqualero” (which appeared on the 1967 Miles Davis quintet album Sorcerer) and “Mysterious Traveller” (from the so-titled 1974 Weather Report album). Carrington soloed on drums early into “Masqualero,” with Spalding bowing the lead for a stretch on bass and Allen providing sparse, thoughtful comping on piano.

Start Your Free Trial to Continue Reading

Become a JazzTimes member to explore our complete archive of interviews, profiles, columns, and reviews written by music's best journalists and critics.
Originally Published