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Peter Eldridge : Disappearing Day

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Among vocal-group gurus, Peter Eldridge is surely the most richly accomplished. A founding member of New York Voices, Eldridge is also a driving force of MOSS, with Luciana Souza, Kate McGarry, Theo Bleckmann and fellow NYV cornerstone Lauren Kinhan. He was tapped, alongside Kurt Elling, by legends Mark Murphy and Jon Hendricks to complete their Four Brothers summit, and he contributed to the luxuriant tapestry of Bobby McFerrin’s landmark VOCAbuLarieS. Yet Eldridge has also carved out an impressive solo career, releasing six albums since the millennium’s turn.

Its head-scratcher of a title notwithstanding-Eldridge, with his arresting sound and quiet authority, is fully present across 11 of 12 tracks, once displaced by a choir-Disappearing Day plays to his vocal-harmony strengths. Most of the dense, complex arrangements feature additional voices, including such eminent guests as Kinhan, Becca Stevens and the Manhattan Transfer’s Janis Siegel. His broad appreciation for the pop landscape is also on glorious display, stretching from a furtive, urgent reading of the Sinatra hit “Witchcraft” and tender folds of Leonard Bernstein’s “Some Other Time” to a delightful cover of “I Wish I Had an Evil Twin,” written by Stephin Merritt of the indie-pop band Magnetic Fields.

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