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Ethan Iverson: The Purity of the Turf (Criss Cross)

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Ethan Iverson: "The Purity of the Turf"
Ethan Iverson: “The Purity of the Turf”

When pianist Ethan Iverson plays “Song for My Father” on his trio album The Purity of the Turf, it seems light-years removed from his best-known music (the Bad Plus, bands led by Billy Hart and Albert “Tootie” Heath). He plays the standard, well, like a standard, working the pocket for all it’s worth and piling up melodies within Horace Silver’s harmonic signature.

Until he doesn’t. Two thirds of the way through, Iverson rebounds from a conventional turnaround into a clanging, repeated chord that defies the song’s harmony, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Nasheet Waits’ support and any semblance of melody. The device only lasts about 10 seconds, but the effect is permanent. And the fun of listening to The Purity of the Turf is in the anticipation of Iverson throwing such wrenches into the works.

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