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Colin Fisher: Reflections of the Invisible World (Halocline Trance)

A review of the multi-instrumentalist's solo album

Colin Fisher: Reflections of the Invisible World
The cover of Reflections of the Invisible World by Colin Fisher

Multi-instrumentalist Colin Fisher has made a treasure trove of disparate recordings over the last several years. In his collaborator guise, the Toronto-based composer/improviser wreaked punk-jazz havoc on saxophone and guitar with Many Arms and Monas. As a bandleader, he explored the spiritual-jazz cosmos on Living Midnight, joining forces with fellow multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter, bassist Brandon Lopez, and drummer Marc Edwards. 

On his newest set, the eclectic ante is upped even further. Who needs a cadre of players to help interpret his vision when Fisher can handle all the instruments himself? That’s precisely what he does on Reflections of the Invisible World, a true one-man show.

Fisher has also traded the harsh wall of skronk at the heart of previous group releases for woozy, psychedelia-tinged dreamscapes. He navigated similar terrain on 2018’s V Le Pape and The Garden of Unknowing, even showing off his drum chops on the latter, but jazzy beats are nowhere to be found here. Instead, Fisher embraces minimalist meditations, and the effect is intoxicating as he puts his looping effects into overdrive on tracks like “Monadic Mirror,” “Zero Experience,” and “Salient Charm.” These introspective pieces are easy to get lost in.

Mostly on guitar and electronics throughout (save for “Sanctum,” a melodious chunk of David Lynch-ian jazz-noir), Fisher is a heady player, a texture and mood scientist on par with David Torn, Anthony Pirog, Nick Millevoi, and Mike Baggetta. Reflections of the Invisible World affirms his place in the company of those aces.