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Satchmo Goes Digital

The complete archives of the Louis Armstrong House Museum in New York are now available online

Louis Armstrong in the recording studio (photo: Frank Bradley)
Louis Armstrong in a rehearsal for the album "Disney Sings the Satchmo Way," Hollywood, May 1968 (photo: Jack Bradley)
Left to right: Lionel Hampton, Gene Krupa, and Louis Armstrong
Left to right: Lionel Hampton, Gene Krupa, and Armstrong pose for a photo at a rehearsal for the Timex All Star Jazz show, April 30, 1958. (photo: Maynard Frank Wolfe)
A page from one of Louis Armstrong's scrapbooks, containing newspaper clippings from 1927 and 1928
A page from one of Louis Armstrong's scrapbooks, containing newspaper clippings from 1927 and 1928 (courtesy of the Louis Armstrong House Museum Collections)
Dizzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong rehearse for the fourth "Timex All Star Jazz Show" on January 7, 1959.
Dizzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong rehearse for the fourth Timex All Star Jazz Show on January 7, 1959. (photo: Maynard Frank Wolfe)
Louis Armstrong at home in Queens with wife Lucille, 1967
Louis Armstrong at home in Queens with wife Lucille, 1967 (photo: Jack Bradley)
Carmen McRae, Dave Brubeck, and Louis Armstrong recording The Real Ambassadors in 1961
Carmen McRae, Dave Brubeck, and Louis Armstrong recording "The Real Ambassadors" in 1961 (photo: Jack Bradley)
Roland Kirk and Louis Armstrong
Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Louis Armstrong chat on W. 47th St. in New York between sessions for Armstrong's final album, "Louis 'Country and Western' Armstrong," 1970 (photo: Jack Bradley)
Louis Armstrong at home in Queens, June 1971
Louis Armstrong at home in Queens, June 1971 (photo: Jack Bradley)

Photo above: Louis Armstrong in a rehearsal for the album Disney Sings the Satchmo Way, Hollywood, May 1968 (photo: Jack Bradley). This is one of approximately 16,000 photographs that are part of the online Louis Armstrong House Collections; see more in the slideshow.

The Louis Armstrong House Museum Collections—constituting “the world’s largest archives for a single jazz musician,” according to Ricky Riccardi, the institution’s Director of Research Collections—have long been available to the curious eye. “The archives have been open to the public since 1994,” Riccardi notes. “But it’s always been by appointment only, and you needed to come to Queens College [in Queens, N.Y.].” Those limiting factors, once a deterrent or at the very least an expense on multiple fronts, are now a thing of the past. The holdings have been digitized and, as of the housing website’s launch in November of 2018, any item in the archives can be accessed from anywhere across the globe.

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