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Norah Jones: Into the Deep

With help from collaborators including Wayne Shorter and Brian Blade, the mega-selling singer-songwriter sets out on her most meaningful exploration of the jazz tradition yet

On May 11, 2014, Norah Jones took the stage at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., during “Blue Note at 75,” an all-star concert celebrating … Read More "Norah Jones: Into the Deep"
Norah Jones
Jason Moran, Jones, John Patitucci, Wayne Shorter and Brian Blade (from left) stretch out on "I've Got to See You Again" at the Kennedy Center in 2014
In 2002, with her managers and colleagues and EMI personnel including Blue Note Records head Bruce Lundvall (far left), Jones celebrates her debut's new gold status

On May 11, 2014, Norah Jones took the stage at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., during “Blue Note at 75,” an all-star concert celebrating the rich history and robust health of jazz’s most iconic record company. The singer-songwriter and pianist-a Blue Note artist since the start of this century, signed by the late Bruce Lundvall when she was just 21-performed a solo version of the Hoagy Carmichael standard “The Nearness of You,” the last song on her 2002 debut, Come Away With Me: by far the label’s biggest mainstream-pop success, with more than 26 million copies sold worldwide.

Jones, now 37, then sang another ballad from that album, Jesse Harris’ Indo-blues shuffle “I’ve Got to See You Again,” playing it for the first time with a diamond-standard jazz band: saxophonist Wayne Shorter, bassist John Patitucci and drummer Brian Blade-three-fourths of Shorter’s titanic working quartet-plus pianist Jason Moran, the evening’s musical director. The result was a stunning, bonded ascension of voice and improvisation-“something I had never heard in my life,” recalls current Blue Note President Don Was, who was standing by the side of the stage. “I’d never had that cocktail before.”

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