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2011 North Sea Jazz Festival

Photos by Stephen Hotsma from the 2011 North Sea Jazz Festival

Janelle Monáe at North Sea Jazz 2011
Janelle Monáe at North Sea Jazz 2011
BB King at North Sea Jazz 2011
Amadou & Mariam at North Sea Jazz 2011
Sergio Mendes at North Sea Jazz 2011
Charles Lloyd at North Sea Jazz 2011
Chaka Khan at North Sea Jazz 2011
Seal at North Sea Jazz 2011
Seal at North Sea Jazz 2011
Selah Sue at North Sea Jazz 2011
Selah Sue at North Sea Jazz 2011
Candy Dulfer at North Sea Jazz 2011
Dr John at North Sea Jazz 2011
Mavis Staples at North Sea Jazz 2011
Tom Jones at North Sea Jazz 2011
Raul Midon at North Sea Jazz 2011
Snoop Dogg at North Sea Jazz 2011
Bootsy Collins at North Sea Jazz 2011
Omara Portuondo at North Sea Jazz 2011
Visitors looking at some of the festival posters
Otis Taylor at North Sea Jazz 2011
Herbie Hancock & Wayne Shorter at North Sea Jazz 2011
Marcus Miller at North Sea Jazz 2011
Natalie Cole at North Sea Jazz 2011
Candy Dulfer at North Sea Jazz 2011

About 13 hundred artists, spread out over 150 performances in three days, on 13 different stages visited by more than 23 thousand people a day. Jazz, latin jazz, world music, pop hip hop, it’s all there. That is North Sea Jazz Festival in the Netherlands, world’s greatest indoor jazz festival. This year again, an incredible list of musicians gave an appearance, amongst them some true jazz legends like BB King, Toots Thielemans, Natalie Cole, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Short and Marcus Miller. Also many young talents were showing their skills. Like Trombone Shorty, who played from Louis Armstrongs repertoire. Other names worth seeing were Selah Sue, Janelle Monáe Ben l’Oncle Soul and Dutch trumpeter Kyteman who was given a carte blance to play three different shows in three days.

Some performances were less jazz than you might expect at such a festival, like Snoop Dogg on Sunday. He “played” mostly songs from his debut album Doggystyle, but never really impressed the audience and neither convinced why he should be playing at a jazz festival.

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Originally Published