Become a member and get exclusive access to articles, live sessions and more!
Start Your Free Trial

The John Coltrane Quintet Featuring Eric Dolphy: So Many Things: The European Tour 1961

Eric Dolphy’s bolstering of the Classic Quartet into a titan-heavy quintet has long split the Coltrane camp. The naysayers cite an ensemble sound that had become too busy, with Dolphy, as master colorist, providing too many bright and distracting rays. The Dolphy booster club touts a more progressive mode of thinking, pointing to a flexibility … Read More “The John Coltrane Quintet Featuring Eric Dolphy: So Many Things: The European Tour 1961”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Jon Batiste/Chad Smith/Bill Laswell: The Process

Certain albums just radiate a lot more groove than others, and with its hoodoo rhythms, souped-up dub textures and “When the Levee Breaks”-style drum surges, The Process is, at times, that rare brand of jazz that can double as club music. Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith provides a lot of the direction here, … Read More “Jon Batiste/Chad Smith/Bill Laswell: The Process”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Branford Marsalis: In My Solitude: Live at Grace Cathedral

It took a while to get there, but Branford Marsalis’ first unaccompanied live album, cut in the same hallowed San Franciscan church-space as Duke Elilngton’s 1960s Sacred Concerts, feels like an inevitable visitation. This is one man alone with his three saxophones, but the music is almost always keenly dialogic, a series of conversations between … Read More “Branford Marsalis: In My Solitude: Live at Grace Cathedral”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Chick Corea: Portraits

Jelly Roll Morton had his “Finger Breaker,” and so in the same pianistic spirit this two-disc Chick Corea set might as well be subtitled “Genre Buster.” Solo piano recitals are as close as jazz gets to classical music, but Corea has an entirely new slant on those less-than-common proceedings: treat a series of gigs as … Read More “Chick Corea: Portraits”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Charlie Haden/Jim Hall: Charlie Haden/Jim Hall

Cut at the Montreal International Jazz Festival in July 1990, this Haden-Hall bass/guitar duet album smacks of affinity, several ways over. The opening “Bemsha Swing” commences with a super-fluid Haden bass riff, nailing the song’s outside-of-time feel while creating a distinctly ebon and quiet sound space for Hall’s guitar to come ambling in and try … Read More “Charlie Haden/Jim Hall: Charlie Haden/Jim Hall”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Miles Davis: Miles at the Fillmore–Miles Davis 1970: The Bootleg Series Vol. 3

Miles Davis’ late 1960s and early 1970s live electric music always had a physicality to it, a heft that could make it feel as though something was leaning on you as you listened. Darker, bluesy shadings suggested an undercurrent of early soul and R&B, but this four-disc set culled from a quartet of June 1970 … Read More “Miles Davis: Miles at the Fillmore–Miles Davis 1970: The Bootleg Series Vol. 3”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Miles Davis: The Original Mono Recordings

There’s a tendency to consider monaural recordings as stuff for the hoi polloi, what you got back in the late 1950s and early ’60s if you weren’t well-heeled enough to have high-end stereo equipment. But as this nine-disc box makes plain, mono, so far as Miles Davis’ ’56 to ’61 Columbia recordings go, has a … Read More “Miles Davis: The Original Mono Recordings”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Charles Mingus: The Jazz Workshop Concerts 1964-1965

Certain Mosaic boxes pull rank on others, no small accomplishment given the unilateral quality of the company’s various releases. This particular set, though, is one of the half dozen or so true heavies: an epic slab of absolutely vital-and vanguard-1960s music, and a whole new way of looking at Charles Mingus. Timed to the 90th … Read More “Charles Mingus: The Jazz Workshop Concerts 1964-1965”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

The A, B, C & D of Boogie Woogie: Live in Paris

As one of rock’s most eloquent drummers-and one who never lacked for groove-Charlie Watts always seemed like he’d be a boogie-woogie natural, even if the Rolling Stones tended to avoid that medium. But this is boogie-woogie central here, as you’d expect from this fourpiece’s moniker, with the occasional rock ‘n’ roll backbeat pushing the band … Read More “The A, B, C & D of Boogie Woogie: Live in Paris”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Kenny Drew/Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen : Duo

This is about as convivial as jazz gets, and if you like listening to music that feels like it’s talking to you, Kenny Drew and Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen are close to ideal companions. Which makes sense, given the rapport so in evidence on these sessions from April 1973 and mid-winter 1974. First, one notices the … Read More “Kenny Drew/Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen : Duo”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Bill Dixon: Envoi

Bracingly conceptual, trumpeter Bill Dixon’s live Envoi is for the listener whose tastes run towards the heady. If you’re prone to nodding in agreement as you listen to something like Ornette Coleman’s Swedish recordings for Blue Note, here are your latest stomping grounds, spread across two gargantuan movements: one at 24 1/2 minutes, the other … Read More “Bill Dixon: Envoi”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Alan Pasqua: Twin Bill: Two Piano Music of Bill Evans

An album intended as an homage to Bill Evans can be a bit of tricky business, given how dissociative Evans’ playing could be. There is not a single player that one might mistake for him, and few that can be recognized faster. This provides an opportunity of sorts for Alan Pasqua, as dedicated an Evans … Read More “Alan Pasqua: Twin Bill: Two Piano Music of Bill Evans”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Wolfert Brederode Quartet: Post Scriptum

When a jazz band is able to strike a balance with music that is brooding and personal yet outward and approachable, listeners who otherwise wouldn’t agree on much are in for a shared treat. This second album from Dutch pianist Wolfert Brederode’s international band isn’t the cheeriest set you’ll ever encounter, but within its quietude … Read More “Wolfert Brederode Quartet: Post Scriptum”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

The Modern Jazz Quartet: The Complete Atlantic Studio Recordings of the Modern Jazz Quartet 1956-64

The Modern Jazz Quartet has typically been slotted a notch below the top jazz ensembles: a worthy enough unit, but also a source of consternation for fans of the genre, given how readily the band transcended it. They are certainly the most Bach-ian of jazz bands and, at their best, the most elegant. This seven-disc … Read More “The Modern Jazz Quartet: The Complete Atlantic Studio Recordings of the Modern Jazz Quartet 1956-64”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Duke Ellington: The Complete 1932-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra

Mosaic isn’t exactly mucking around on this gargantuan 11-disc set that essentially distills the first grand age of Ellingtonia into the contents of one box set. There would, of course, be other ages of comparable majesty, but this set represents the first full ripening of Ellington’s highly idiosyncratic and highly attuned big-band compositional style. In … Read More “Duke Ellington: The Complete 1932-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

John Carter and Bobby Bradford: Mosaic Select 36

If you’re an admirer of saxophonist-clarinetist John Carter and trumpeter Bobby Bradford’s musical union, you’ll surely appreciate the invaluable service provided by Mosaic with this three-disc set. Previously, if you wanted to hear these two West Coast freeboppers, you had to do some searching. Their music has never been easy to come by, something that … Read More “John Carter and Bobby Bradford: Mosaic Select 36”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Steve Tibbetts: Natural Causes

As music to get lost in, this Steve Tibbetts album is state of the art. Featuring only Tibbetts on guitar, piano, kalimba and bouzouki and Marc Anderson on percussion-including a range of gongs-this is a decidedly Eastern disc, as though it were sourced from a temple ceremony in Indonesia. There are individual tracks here, but … Read More “Steve Tibbetts: Natural Causes”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Brad Mehldau And Renée Fleming: Love Sublime

Tough not to completely give in to an album like this, where austerity is tantamount to a confession of faith and jazz rendered almost as psalmody. Mehldau’s concept, realized with spartan instrumentation, is grand: provide pianistic settings for the words of the young Rainer Maria Rilke-composed shortly after a stay in a Russian monastery-and allow … Read More “Brad Mehldau And Renée Fleming: Love Sublime”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.

Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys: Legends of Country Music

Jazz zealots might be put off by the notion of a country ensemble overhauling the music, but my how these guys could swing-or so the country-and-western apologists would maintain, even if Bob Wills and his bands always seemed more inclined to flat out throb than swing a rhythm. From the first few tracks of this … Read More “Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys: Legends of Country Music”

To access this content, you must purchase JazzTimes Membership.