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[email protected]’s Jazz Hall of Fame

At least it’s not in Cleveland…

Under the direction of Wynton Marsalis (who just loves appearing regularly in this space) Jazz at Lincoln Center announced recently that it plans to convert part of New York City’s 100,000-square-foot Frederick P. Rose Hall into the permanent home for the Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame.

Opening in October of 2004, the Jazz Hall of Fame will be a multimedia experience complete with interactive kiosks, projection screens and audio to provide its visitors with access to the history of jazz.

There will even be a glass-encased display of the saxophone Charlie Parker used to hit his 500th home run. Oops. Sorry, got my Halls mixed up.

Furthermore, the Rockwell Group, the architecture firm chosen to construct the hall, plans on creating a physical design that will celebrate jazz by accentuating flexibility in order to capture the essence of improvisation that’s crucial to the spirit of the music.

“The Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame will be the inner sanctum of our new home,” said Marsalis (pictured). “It will be a place where we welcome people to come learn about jazz and revere the spirit of the music. We will honor the jazz greats in the EJHF and hopefully inspire new generations of musicians and audiences.”

Each year, Jazz at Lincoln Center will be entrusted to induct a new class of jazz masters into the Hall of Fame, with programming created to honor them.

A selection committee will nominate inductees, who will then be submitted to an international panel of jazz leaders for voting. Voting by the international panel will occur in early 2004, with the lucky inductees announced in April 2004.

Vote for Don Mattingly people! Best defensive first baseman of all time. He deserves it. Come on, Wynton!

To learn more about the Jazz Hall of Fame, visit www.jazzatlincolncenter.org.

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Originally Published