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Coke, [email protected] Team Up for Jazz

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola? That’s what happens when the world’s greatest soft drink donates $10 million toward the completion of Jazz at Lincoln Center’s new digs, Frederick P. Rose Hall.

With the new [email protected] building being less than a year away from its scheduled opening, the organization still finds itself $32 million short of completion funds. Coca-Cola stepped up and popped in $10 mil: $8 million is for construction; $2 million is earmarked for programming. In exchange for the donation, [email protected] has agreed to name one of its three performance areas Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola. It’s Frederick P. Rose Hall’s smallest venue, a 140-seat clublike space. “It’s going to be a late-night room,” Wynton Marsalis told the New York Times. “Piano trios, a piano-bar-type situation.” During the day Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola will be used for the [email protected] education programs.

[email protected] has been battling a money and time crunch to complete its luxurious new home, the first of its kind dedicated to jazz programming. The slow development of the AOL Time Warner building, a 2.1 million square foot development under construction at Columbus Circle that will house [email protected], has delayed the opening of Frederick P. Rose Hall. Money promised from New York City for [email protected] has yet to arrive because of post-9/11 budget crunches. [email protected] has received only $5.86 million of the $25.8 million pledged by NYC.

Corporations looking to add their name next to Coke’s can get in on the action. [email protected] is hoping to name a $10 million lobby area and a $5 million recording and broadcast studio for sponsors willing to pony up the bones. That still leaves [email protected] about $17 million short of its goal. So step right up: plenty of space for donations, people, don’t crowd, don’t crowd.

For more information, go to www.jazzatlincolncenter.org.

Originally Published