Something You Don't Know About blu ray player reviews Will Certainly Surprise You

The Sony BDP-S790 is more solidly constructed than the company’s previous go over here now, with a mix of aluminium and thick plastic making up the majority of the body. The BDP-S790's model number and USB port on the player's right side. The back of the Sony BDP-S790 is its most interesting part. Here, you’ll find not one but two HDMI outputs, an Ethernet network port, an additional USB port, optical and coaxial digital audio, as well as a set of backup composite audio/video connectors. The BDP-S790 has Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n built in.

Ports on the rear of the BDP-S790, including two HDMI outputs. The dual HDMI output is an interesting feature. Its advantage is in making it possible to connect an A/V receiver or home theatre system with one HDMI port, and using the other port to send an unadulterated HDMI signal to your TV or home theatre projector. If you’ve got an A/V receiver that won’t pass through 3D video, for example, this is a big selling point. Turning on the Sony BDP-S790 for the first time, there’s a very basic setup procedure to be followed. When we turned on the player and connected it to our wired network, we were quickly informed of an available software update — doing this adds new features and fixes any problems with existing ones. Wireless network setup is reasonably quick, and the remote is labeled with a T9 keyboard layout (ABC on keypad button 2, DEF on 3, and so on) which makes entering long alphanumeric passwords slightly easier.

We really liked how fast the BDP-S790 was to respond to remote control commands, and how swift it was to navigate through menus and enter applications. It loaded Blu-ray and DVD movies roughly on par with competitors, booting into the menu of our test Avatar 3D Blu-ray in 27 seconds and into The Dark Knight in 20 seconds flat. We thought the amount of video customisation available through the BDP-S790’s menu system — accessible through Options while you’re watching a 2D or 3D Blu-ray movie — was excellent. There are several increments for each of the Texture Remaster, Super Resolution, Smoothing, Contrast Remaster and Clear Black options that let you tailor the BDP-S790’s output to suit your tastes. With a little adjustment, we found that the second increment of each setting produced the most detailed picture with attractive contrast. Its lower-resolution upscaling is also excellent, bringing just the right amount of sharpening and smoothing to 480p DVD video and accurately de-blocking lower quality downloaded video.

We didn’t have a chance to test the Blu-ray player’s 4K up-scaling — this is a feature that’s only worthwhile when you’re connecting to a 4K TV or projector, and since almost all of these units aren’t going to hit the Australian market until the very end of the year, it’s a bit redundant at the moment. Theoretically, 4K upscaling from a Blu-ray player should be superior to 4K upscaling from a TV — it’s earlier in the chain from the video source to its display — but we’ll reserve our judgment until later. click over here now

Add a Comment

You need to log in to comment on this article. No account? No problem!

  • Email E-mail
  • Share Share
  • Rss RSS
  • Report Report

Community Authors

xizijecteky786